The post with the dragon tattoo

Discussion of cyber security provokes mixed responses.

On the one hand, eyes roll and the carrier of the cyber security papyrus is quickly branded as a geek. Perhaps to be tolerated. Probably not to be invited to supper. For fear of boring the guests with a barrage of acronyms and poorly parsed prophecies of doom.

On the other hand, hackers have captured the public imagination. Think of the girl with the dragon tattoo. Think of WikiLeaks. Perhaps just think.

Winner takes all?

Earlier this week, in an article in The Guardian, and during a BBC radio piece, Richard Sambrook, former head of BBC News and director of the Centre for Journalism at Cardiff University, warned that TV news audiences could fall by a third within a decade. 

Younger viewers are tuning in for just 25 hours a year. And, wait for it, older people, are increasingly adopting the digital habits of younger viewers and watching less TV news. This structural shift is not part of some dystopian future.

It’s part of a wave of change sweeping over the media industry.

Winning in the attention economy?

A day of contrast today at the NAB Show in Las Vegas as the doors were flung open on the first day of the Exhibition. 

The floor, as ever, was filled to capacity with crowds marvelling at the latest broadcast technology on offer from all the expected vendors, the usual suspects.

But, will these vendors be the same next year, or in five years time? Or is something stirring in the woods?

Is bigger, better, faster the way. Or do we need to change gear, even change the road we are on?

Blending the right ingredients

The first of a series of (near) live posts from this year's NAB Show here in Las Vegas.

I promised to feature what's hot and what's not. Let's see if I can live up to that as the week unfolds.

Today's first post is a scene setter. Let’s call it my establishing shot. 

The exhibition component of the Show kicks off Monday. This morning the conference, or rather a series of curated conferences and (self styled) summits, got off to an early, and surprisingly well attended, start under the bright Vegas sun.

I chose to walk from my hotel to the conference centre. This immediately marked me out as a quirky out-of-the box thinker, or perhaps a mad Englishman out in the (pre) midday sun. No one walks here.

So, back to the conference. Saturday is a settling in day, the exhibition spaces are being prepped, the lines at Starbucks are packed with exhibitors taking a break, the lines for badges winding between here and the airport. My (perhaps) jet-lagged decision to rise early, and so turn up before 8am, meant I breezed by and picked up my badge without a line and even had time for a chat.

If I’m honest, I didn’t expect to take much away from this first day. But, I did. 

Three things.

Limitless opportunities - are you ready?

Change and transformation.

New horizons. New ideas. Mould breaking models and vibrant new ventures.

Will the hype surrounding this new year's NAB Show in Las Vegas truly reflect the current state of our industry?

The media and entertainment industry has become unleashed. Dynamic innovation and cutting-edge technologies are shattering the boundaries of content and opening up limitless opportunities.

Is it overblown hype or just scratching the surface? Can the changes sweeping our industry continue to surprise and delight us?

Are we heading for a technology SNAFU?

SNAFU began life as a military acronym during the Second World War. Battle weary cynics used it to describe ‘Situation Normal, All F****d Up.’

I’m not a battle-weary cynic but having recently taken part in several technology focused discussions with industry peers, I am amazed how, in 2016, the same questions are being asked, the same challenges being talked about and the same mistakes being made So how do we avoid this ‘Situation Normal’ in our industry?

We hear a lot of talk about Change in relation to some new technology solution implementation as though it's something new and something we don’t know how to deal with. We talk about “resistance to change” but sometimes struggle to effectively deal with it. Some are better than others at implementing new technologies that require new workflows. But the majority find it very hard to deliver all the promised benefits. Why is it apparently so difficult? What can we do to improve the adoption of new ways of working and fully realise the potential of what new technology enables?

Changing Times

Change is one of the most significant challenges that any organisation faces. The human condition is averse to change and even those who profess to be comfortable with it, often approach different or new tasks in a similar way. The processes in many organisations have hardly altered for years, however, with the arrival of digital technology new working practices, processes and interactions are now essential.

Organisations are now facing up to the changes imposed on them by digital technology affecting delivery, production, distribution and customer interaction. Additionally, with the emergence of new consumption methods like social networking and internet services, plus the introduction of alternative suppliers and business models, the ‘change challenges’ are magnified.